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20120928
20121006
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identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
appreciate their work and we cooperate yearly, thing that is are covered by federal law, it's not an easy solution, but the vast majority of san francisco businesses provide insurance and the vast, vast majority of son fra*ns businesses are spending required amounts of money, every survey and report by your agency show that and supervisor campos has acknowledge hated but there is an issue with some categories of business, but we're working together, small business associations, the chamber on educating employers and employees on the rights and obligations under this law. we've worked with television ads on cable television, the city, websites, direct communication with members, thousands of employers have been communicated with by our organizations and by the city to understand how to make this work for the employee and how to make it work financially for the employer because you have to remember in the last half a dozen years, the cost of small business to employ entry level workers in san francisco has gone up 50%. that is health mandate, sick leave, minimum wage, things we believe in,
. to me there is absolutely no reason why any law should be an opt-in program such as this. it smells of coercion and that's not something i'm willing to vote for, for my residents in district 2 and for all representatives in san francis san francisco. supervisor campos, i too trust in ed harrington, his qualifications are impeccable but i want concrete numbers if i'm going to vote on nothing, or use that to vote on something and the fact is we have no numbers in front of us, they've never been presented to us, and to articulate that creating local power is a biproduct of this is a fallacy. i think when people articulate that and tell other folks that is part of what we're voting on today, that is untrue. i appreciate the fact that people have differences of opinion about how it may or may not be financed in the future but it is not on the table today and should not be articulated as such. i appreciate people's comments. to me it's a concept of choice. i think having an opt-out program for the residents is absolutely the wrong approach. >> president chiu: supervisor wiener. >> supervi
.c. berkeley and hastings law school, bob joined a family firm and became active in numerous civic organizations, particularly within the jewish community as well as on our san francisco human rights commission. he also had a love of politics and successfully ran the mccarthy campaign for the board of supervisors. and i know that he will be missed dearly by the community and his family. my third in memoriam is for gary cray who is known by many in the telegraph hill community, my district, as the filbert steps gardner. gary tended to the gardens of the filbert steps, which is one of our city's great hidden treasures for more than three decades. and he took care of the sprawling garden as a volunteer. it was truly a labor of love for him and he was never paid a dime for t. he worked his hearts -- poured his heart into his work to create a clean, green and serene space that many in my neighborhood and throughout the city have grown to love and appreciate. in addition to caring for gardens, he was also someone who was dedicated to our city's architectural heritage and was a co-founder
ago and they say proposition 209 is the reason black contractors are not working there. the law has stepped in the way where, today, african-american contractors are not -- not one job in san francisco, are african-americans working on. but a japanese company is controlling 90% of the work in san francisco -- homes, webcore and they do not hire african-american. and i'm saying that something's got to be done. and you guys -- the supervisors, and whether you know it or not, one day this is going to boil over. and when it does, everybody will say they don't know anything about it. but as i was telling some guys the other day, most of you don't know, i'm a veteran, and a disabled american, a war veteran. and i don't understand how i can be in the military, and fight for a country that they got laws now that prevent us from working in it. something is wrong with this whole thing. and particularly the city of st. francis to say there's not one, not one african-american firm working on any job in san francisco. >> president chiu: thank you. next speaker. >> i live on 6th street between ho
. the issues people have, like this is an opt out program, that is state law. a continuance will not change state law. if you're looking for us to try to find another vendor, been there, done that, several times. the only group that's available is shell. the only group that was available to marine that made it work is shell. some day, some time, this may be different. but that is not in any near future. i am not telling you it is the perfect program, but i am tell you it's the only one that we believe is possible in any kind of near-term future. and i don't see how it changes. >> supervisor campos: thank you. >> president chiu: supervisor avalos. >> supervisor avalos: thank you, president chiu. i just want to voice my strong support for the clean power sf program and i want to thank general manager ed harrington and his staff, barbara hale, and others, for their great work. also, for the staff, for lafco, nancy miller, and jason freid for all the great work together, the sponsor of this work today, supervisor campos, who has picked up the baton from ross mirkarimi, who picked it up from tom
a lot of citizens oversight and not  just transparency through the sunshine laws, but real oversight and i support the amendments by supervisor chiu and i hope you approve those. >> any other members of public wishing to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. supervisor kim? >> thank you. i am actually happy to hear that we have three amendments moving forward. and i would like some clarification, but before on those amendments, because i think that the one concern that this entire board has is on our affordable housing obligations. and our replacement housing obligation as well. i think the big question that i think that continues to -- that i continue to ask as we talk about recreating a commission, along the lines of what we had previously. is what is the appropriate balance of power? the checks and balances that we have here between the legislative and executive branch? i think members of public have brought up numerous concerns that have occurred in history of redevelopment and to counter that they we have as much protections as possible is to always strike that bala
. implementing the state redevelopment dissolution law. >> item 4, supervisor olague. aye. supervisor wiener, aye. supervisor avalos? aye. supervisor campos? no. president chiu? aye. supervisor chu aye. cohen aye. supervisor elsbernd? aye. supervisor kim? aye. supervisor mar? aye. there are 9 ayes and one no. >> the the ordinance is finally passed. item 5. >> item 5, ordinance appropriating $54 3.2 million from the proceed of sale of bonds for cap fail improvement projects to the airport commission for fiscal year 2012 through 2013 and placing appropriation and control is reserved pending the bond sale. >> roll call vote. >> on item 5, supervisor olague? aye. wiener? aye. supervisor avalos? aye. supervisor campos? aye. president chiu? aye. supervisor chu? aye. supervisor cohen? aye. supervisor elsbernd? aye. supervisor kim? kim aye. supervisor mar? aye. there are 10 ayes. >> the item is passed. the ordinance is finally passed. item 6. >> item 6 is an ordinance amending the transportation code to restrict large vehicle parking between the hours of 12:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. from the municipal transp
, it became law december 25th, christmas morning. okay. this is the same bill when it was going through. the yellow tag is from tom rivard who was our noise man. and who just recently retired, he basically wrote it. he sent it to me during -- when it was going through [speaker not understood], section 29 09 deals with your issues marked by green. all the best. tom rivard. and this is basically residential property noise. they can go, if you build something, remodel something, you can go five decibels above what we heard last night. that's noise. and on the other page it will say commercial places can go 8 decibels. and we know that when you go to 10 decibels, basically you're doubling the amount of noise. and we'll end today, that's the noise map of 2009. and the deeper colors, that's a lot of noise. that's a little noise. but it's all one [inaudible]. thank you. >> thank you very much. thank you. next speaker. >>> good afternoon, honorable board of supervisors. [speaker not understood] and i am [speaker not understood] living in the mission district in san francisco. if you are as tire
about changes to density. it doesn't talk about whether it's in-law units? you know, in terms of how the housing affordability and the crisis that we're facing, it's such a multi-faceted problem. that as i said before, unless we have some huge massive influx of federal dollars so we can just build enormous amounts of below market rate housing, public investment is not going to get us out the hole we're in. it's one piece of the puzzle and i will stop using that phrase. [ laughter ] because i have said it too many times already. i'm they are going to start creating a drinking game around it every time i say it. it's not even close to the whole solution and my concern is that this presents a distorted and miss leading picturet planning commission whether project x fits or doesn't fit into where we need to go to resolve our housing crisis. this is not comprehensive and i think we all know how this information presented in this specific way will be used. the information exists. the [phr-rplts/] puts planning department puts out reports and the budget analyst puts out reports. this is bei
. that plan is mandated by state law and its purpose is to really figure out what the transportation needs for the city long-term are. and, so, i think it's important for us to begin the discussion of what those needs are, what the future looks like, and what the challenges in meeting the needs that the city has and will have, what those challenges will be. we need to think about this issue and specifically focus on ways in which we can bring revenue into the system, the kinds of investments that need to be made not only by the county transportation authority, but other agencies like the san francisco mta. i look forward to a substantive discussion. and again, this is the beginning of this discussion and we know that we will have additional discussions that will take place. i also want to note that because of the good work of our staff at the authority, we recently received some money on the planning front. we actually received half a million dollars from caltrans, a planning grant and it's a grant that will allow for work to be done in various neighborhoods to really think about the needs
form 700s every year, under state law, the ordinance i'm introducing helps to update it since its last revision in 2010. i also want to mention that i'm introducing a resolution to authorize the installation of a new rosy dr*if ter plaque, rosy dr*if ter who wauz part of the north beach telegraph hill community for all of her life is someone who has been a symbol and an icon not just to our city but to the entire country for women who worked in factories since world war ii, the resolution i'm moving forward would allow the city to replace the existing plaque and continue to can xhen rate the memory and the symbol of what rosy dr*if tor stands for, the rest of the items i will submit. >> thank you, supervisor campos? >> thank you very much, madam clerk, i want to take an opportunity to note that in district 9 and specifically in the mission in the last few days, we've had a couple of incidents including a shooting that took place about over a week ago and we also had vandalism that took place on the valencia corridor and i just want to take this opportunity to thank the san francisco po
law, the health codes, learning to build coalitions, getting to know supervisors. and i would ask you to reappoint me so that i can continue my work on behalf of all san francisco's animals. thank you. >> thank you. susanna, i did have a quick question. first of all, thank you for your service on the commission already. could you speak to one issue or a legislation that you took particular interest in over your term as a commissioner? something that you worked on that you prioritized during your term. >>> okay. yes, i think the first thing that comes to mind is the fate of the ferrel cat kohl i inin the west end of golden gate park. and i was asked by community leaders to come out and look at the site. and we talked with rec and park about maintaining good habitat for this established colony. so, i think in general ferrel cats and wildlife and the indoor action between them, but that's an issue that i was involved with with the community. >> thank you. >>> um-hm. >> so, last but not least we have shari o'neill. >>> good afternoon. i am dr. shari o'neill and i've been a practicing vete
, and this is definitely a great birthday present. you know, i've known scott weaner for many years. we went to law school together, and i think something he said about our youth today is something that is very, very important for us to remember. you know, as youth, you always have the concept of the invincibility of youth and we've all had that. you're a young person, you don't think that anything can happen to you. but the reality is that for folks who are part of this newer generation, they didn't go through that. and i think it's important for us to underscore the severity of this disease, of this illness, and it's still des mating many communities. and it is especially low-income communities, communities of color, you have gay african-american men, latino men infected on a daily basis. people forget we still have people dying of aids. i had a close friend of mine who recently passed away of aids, michael goldstein, and he was an advocate for hiv prevention for finding a cure for hiv. and you can think of so many michael goldsteins. and dr. colfax and other people mentioned that. their memory lives on
of san francisco in terms of the laws that they lay, what they're, the arrogance of their position. when you have the residents go before them because they are not being, they are not under the eye of observation. then you really see the bad side of why you need to bring this organization to the light where they could be observed. i think it's a good thing but by the same, we need it done like 25 years ago. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is [inaudible] ladies and gentlemen. the history goes back to 25 years ago to the housing authority and my statement i have been using at your commission for years, ain't no mystery, check your history. ladies and gentlemen, there's deeper history in what we're talking about with the city government channel. i'm the one that started that, i'm not going to get the hand for that because of same things the housing authority tenants went through 20 years ago. ladies and gentlemen, i am happy, tickled not pink by black right now because most of the tenants are african-americans. i stand here as the czar of the african-american
out program, again, that's the state law. that's the way it's supposed to work. we will give people two opt out notices before we start to deliver power, to opt out notices after we start giving power and after that they have the option of opting out. we have a rate of $5 as a processing fee or a departure fee if people leave the program after that. that, we've had discussions about is not important. we really don't want to catch people. we want it to be their choice. community outreach, clearly this is based on having a significant education effort to make sure that people, especially people that are monolingual non-english speaking know what they're in for. low income discount, while not required in the program we suggest the lower income discount extend to side two which is a 20% discount for low income customers. we have a million dollars of the money you've appropriated already that we've set aside for this education in public education program. we're talking about paid media, multi-lingual television radio
by law from getting a liquor license because of this outdated and recovery broad alcohol zoning restriction. and we worked together, as we did for the bowling alley before it to grant exemption for single screen movie theaters. that's a bad way to do policy in making one off exemptions so supervisor campos and i are working closer together to come up with a broader reform so we don't have to do one offs and have a more vibrant mission while keeping the -- of the special use district. >> president chiu: supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos: thank you. i want to thank supervisor kim and her office, who are working on this when it was district 6, before it became district 8. and, you know, sarah palin could see russia from alaska and i can see the roxie from district 9. so in some respects, you know, it's all part of the same neighborhood. so i'm supportive of this, and happy to be involved in any effort to ensure that we help the roxie. so thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> actually i want to say thank you to supervisor wiener and his staff because as supervisor wiener
of interest law that allow people to vote when they've been appointed to represent a certain constituency, i would have a hard time now on the fly thing whether a particular commissioner, theoretical commissioner is going to be conflicted on any particular question. typically, that is an issue that we deal with, with the commissioner on a case by case basis as issues come up. >> i feel comfortable with the language as is then. >> supervisor wiener? >> six members of this boards have voted for an amendment that we're now debating afterwards what the amendment is. >> why don't i suggest the following, supervisor kim, i think if we move forward a motion to rescind and restate the amendment so it's clear what we're voting on, i think we understand what the intent is but make it abundantly clear and then we can have further discussion on that. >> my original motion. ing >> okay, motion to rescind. >> seconded by supervisor campos, the previous motion is rescinded, supervisor kim, if you could clarify your amendment. >> and i'm willing to hear supervisor cohen, my original is at least two of the s
was signed into law this year. hopefully providing also some smooth transition with youth coming out of the justice system enrolled back into school. so, i think the arrest trends that are highlighted in our report, and i would be happy to get you copies of them, is sore of worth a hearing in and of itself. but i think in terms of especially as you discussed barriers, making the connection between all of these and maybe we need a multi-system approach to ensuring that youth get the education that they need because often barriers occur. those other systems that are not necessarily immediately educationally related. so, thank you very much. >> so, again, i just want to thank you for really convening this hearing and moving forward. and i know we've gone over our time, but, you know, to try and consolidate the work that's been done over the last 40 years to address the issue, it's really difficult. i did just want to leave you with a couple of things just in terms of what we've considered and discussed within the african-american leadership council and what we've talked about with regar
that skirt our laws. i want to thank all of the tenant advocates who work with my office and thank the city staff and other stakeholders who are here and in particular i want to thank my aide, amy chen, who worked with all of you to get the legislation to where it is today. colleagues i would like to ask for your support, so hopefully or we can move this to the board in short order. thank you for your consideration. >> thank you, president chiu. i did want to ask, if i could be a cosponsor of this measure? i think it's a great piece of legislation, but i had a couple of questions. i know aaron glenn's alter that brad paul referenced the title is surge in sf vacation rentals squeezes residents.". miss haas is quoted as saying there is a "rapid growth in vacation rentals at the time." and then quotes jack, the spokesperson for the city attorney's office saying, "that planning and dbi haven't been any cases forward." i'm wondering what is the problem there? why didn't we bring forth cases when we knew that 15% of golden gateway units, for example were being hotelized. i would like to know why
. and any kind of density and fight the housing element. and oppose in-law units and all of the kind of things that we can be doing to have an impact on the market and not have the escalating rents and housing prices that we see in san francisco. so i think there is a larger picture of housing affordability in the city that is not captured by a dashboard on a given project saying this is how much, low, very low, moderate housing that we have created so far. that is a tiny, tiny piece of the picture and that is sort of where i'm coming from. >> thank you. so supervisor olague, shall we open this up for public comment? >> i just wanted to comment that no one says this is the end-all, be-all. we just think it's one aspect of the bigger, really issue around providing more affordability to residents of the city. and as most of us know, many of these projects are not -- as has been there kind of argument that the more we build, then the greater -- then all of a sudden it's going to create or lift the pressure from the housing market that suddenly if we build more housing, regardless
contact is a law enforcement contact. these contacts are about getting to know these individuals and building trust. sometimes they have to do the job of making that arrest and a lot of times it's building trust and trying to make that breakthrough. and once they do make that breakthrough, you should see the looks on their faces when they come into the office and say, hey, we got a guy, we got a guy that we've been talking to for a year and he wants to come forward and he wants to try it. i can't speak enough about that. their dedication also goes beyond just their work with gang prevention and violence prevention. whenever there is an issue in the district, i can always count on these two to come forward and with some sort of idea, hey, how about if we try this, how about if we try that? they're always thinking towards making improvements, not just within the issues that they work with, but within the district as a whole. they are truly an asset not only to the mission, but to the city of san francisco. and it's a pleasure to be their commanding officer. thank you. >> well, with
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)